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Steve & Pasha Carter: America’s Favorite Business Couple Talks Business, Family, and Leadership | 167

Steve & Pasha Carter: America’s Favorite Business Couple Talks Business, Family, and Leadership | 167

Anyone with the right work ethic, leadership skills, and dedication can build a multi-million dollar business.

Our featured guests today are Steve and Pasha Carter.

Pasha Carter is an NFL Cheerleader turned Multi-Millionaire, who took a $500 investment and turned it into a multi-million dollar empire. She’s an internationally sought after speaker, trainer and Direct Sales Expert.

Steve Carter is a Howard University alum who also built a multi-million dollar networking business. Steve now travels the country training and teaching others how to build successful businesses of their own. He’s now one of the most powerful success coaches in the world.

Together, this is America’s favorite business couple and I’m so happy to share this conversation with our community.

My ask today is that you’d help share this episode. If you're posting to social, please tag @tbpod and use the hashtag #missionfuel

KEY POINTS FROM PASHA & STEVE:

  • @PashaCarter  I am grateful for the opportunity to be on the cover of a magazine, and I am now a writer/contributor for Forbes Magazine.
  • @SteveCarterCLD  I’m thankful for my family every, single day.  I’m watching my children grow, and it excites me to wake up every single morning.“
  • @SteveCarterCLD We believe in doing as much as we can while were here, because time is limited for all of us.”
  • @SteveCarterCLD  Im forever thankful for the way my father raised us, and I’m paying it forward with my kids.
  • Talent is something that God gives you but skill requires you do something.
  • Skill is beating on your craft, day in and day out, until you master it.
  • I failed more, so I have been blessed to achieve more.  
  • More people have told me “No!”, … and I’ve had more ups and downs.  That’s the reason we’ve been able to build one of the most successful organizations in network marketing.
  • To be successful intimately and as business partners, we laid down a couple of non-negotiable ground rules when we started:  100% honesty and communication, and never arguing or going to bed upset with each other.
  • One the main reasons why I join the Direct Sales industry is because I didnt have the money or credit to start a traditional business.
  • @PashaCarter I figured out a way to make it happen.  I didnt want another 12 months or 5 years to find me in the same position because I chose an excuse over figuring out a solution to the problem.
  • @SteveCarterCLD Key components to succeeding in business: believe that you can achieve whatever it is that you want to achieve; find something that you enjoy doing; and don’t be afraid to work.
  • As an aspiring entrepreneur, lay a foundation and plant a seed.
  • Passive income can yield a lifestyle of the wealthy, Robert Kiyosaki.
  • Entrepreneurs are the only people who are crazy enough to say, We’d rather work 12 – 14 hours a day for ourselves than 8 for somebody else.”
  • Communication and integrity are significant attributes for good leaders.
  • If youre more concerned with helping others to accomplish whatever it is they want to accomplish, somehow gives it back to you, if you’re able to successfully do that.
  • Your job, as leaders, is to work yourselves out of a job, so that eventually those you lead dont need your guidance.
  • Were teaching our children to be entrepreneurs, and they’re exploring their passions.
  • Before a child leaves your home they should know how to build a million dollar business.
  • We teach our children to embrace failure.
  • If you failed and made a mistake that means you tried yourself something new and pushed yourself beyond the thing that you can naturally do.

 

THIS EPISODE WAS SPONSORED BY:

The Campaign for Black Male Achievement. Join, support and invest in this movement to help improve the life outcomes of our black men and boys.

 

DID YOU ENJOY THIS PODCAST?

If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, help us reach more trailblazers like you by leaving us a 5 star review! Ratings, reviews and subscribes are extremely helpful to expanding our reach within the Apple community.

 

T. Dallas Smith Discusses The 2% of African Americans in Commercial Real Estate | 166

T. Dallas Smith Discusses The 2% of African Americans in Commercial Real Estate | 166

It’s not enough to just be the first or the largest, you have to pave the way for the next.

Our featured guest today is T. Dallas Smith.

Dallas is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer at T. Dallas Smith & Company.

Dallas began his commercial real estate career in 1982 at Atlanta Air Center Realty under the guidance of Thomas W. Tift as leasing and management representative for the portfolio. In 1989, he became the first African-American broker at Cushman & Wakefield of Georgia.

His affiliation with the company opened doors for many minority brokers. In 1995, he pioneered the brokerage division for H.J. Russell & Company, an African-American owned construction and management firm, where he served as VP of the Brokerage Division. Dallas led the company initiative of acquiring 40 parcels of real estate, a full city block in the intercity of Atlanta resulting in a mixture of office, retail and multifamily developments now valued at over $20 million.

In 2006, with the blessing of the late Herman Russell, Dallas opened T. Dallas Smith & Company, specializing in tenant representation. T. Dallas Smith & Company has led projects across the country with metrics exceeding more than seven million square feet of commercial property leasing and acquisitions and five thousand acres of land purchases. Since its inception, the team has grown exponentially successfully leading transactions totaling over $15 billion in aggregate value. Dallas is an innovator and thought leader in the commercial real estate community and is intentional about cultivating and developing diverse talent to help shape the commercial real estate industry.

My ask today is that you’d help share this episode. If you're posting to social, please tag @tbpod and use the hashtag #missionfuel

KEY POINTS FROM DALLAS:

  • Atlanta born, Atlanta bred, when I die I'll be Atlanta dead
  • I grew up about 20 blocks from downtown Atlanta
  • I grew up in a neighborhood where everybody took care of one another
  • If you're willing to meet people in the heart, not on the exterior, you can cover a lot
  • Herman Russell was the very first cold call I made when I was at Cushman & Wakefield
  • Herman Russell specialized in one thing; plastering
  • People forgot that Herman Russell was a specialist in one thing, that eventually morphed into several other things
  • Be very intentional and sincere about building relationships
  • It really comes down to the golden rule: Treat people the way you want to be treated
  • T. Dallas Smith and Company is the largest African American tenant representation firm in the country.
  • My calling was to bring people who look like me and you, into the commercial real estate space
  • God gave me one word – EXPOSURE
  • The reason there's only 2% of people in commercial real estate that look like me and you is lack of exposure and racism
  • The idea of giving up is not in my DNA
  • You got to be loved in your community first, to be liked in theirs
  • I've literally been the guy who's been too stubborn to quit
  • The scripture says: The footsteps of a righteous man are ordered by the Lord
  • Take one step at a time
  • “There are no such thing as bad teams, only bad leaders” Extreme Leadership book quote
  • Fundamentally, before you leave, you have to serve
  • You want to be a plumber, hang out with plumbers. Find the best person in the field, and go be around that person.
  • Take the first step! If you have an idea that had never been done before, then go study pioneers and learn how they carried out their ideas that had never been done before.
  • Believe in something and believe in yourself
  • Seek His Voice and hear the thing He's called you to do; God called Noah to build the ark. He didn't called Jesse or James.
  • What is that thing He's called you to do? Seek His voice for your direction
  • Between the age of 8 and 10, the things you love doing will be the foundation of what you end up being for the rest of your life

 

THIS EPISODE WAS SPONSORED BY:

The Campaign for Black Male Achievement. Join, support and invest in this movement to help improve the life outcomes of our black men and boys.

 

DID YOU ENJOY THIS PODCAST?

If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, help us reach more trailblazers like you by leaving us a 5 star review! Ratings, reviews and subscribes are extremely helpful to expanding our reach within the Apple community.

 

Christina Lewis: Developing an Entrepreneurial Mindset | 161

Christina Lewis: Developing an Entrepreneurial Mindset | 161

“With an eye and vision for the future, I saw that tech was an ecosystem that people of color were not participating in.”

Our featured guest today is Christina Lewis.

Christina Lewis is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of All Star Code, a computer science nonprofit that empowers Black and Latino young men with skills, networks and mind-sets to become entrepreneurs and succeed in the technology sector.

Christina is a member of the Board of the Reginald F. Lewis Foundation and Chair of the Class of 2002 Associates Committee for Harvard College, her alma mater. She is also on Hunter College’s Computer Science Advisory Board, and is an angel investor and advisor to other entrepreneurs.

My ask today is that you’d share this episode. If you're posting to social, please use the hashtag #missionfuel

KEY POINTS FROM CHRISTINA:

  • Im grateful for my grandmother.  She was born a woman; born Black; and born in a working class family. Were any of these variables different, she would have been a US Senator.  A smart, dynamic, vivacious woman  at 93 she still enjoys gardening, and is still the rock of the family.
  • Im grateful for my mother, Loida Lewis, is a role model for me. She was an ambitious woman, unafraid of risks, who followed her heart. At one point she was the CEO of the largest woman-run business in the United States.
  • My dad, Reginald Lewis, died 25 years ago, when I was 12 years old; and he completed the manuscript of his book, Why Should White Guys Have All the Fun?” in his last year of life.  It has been so rewarding to me and my family that so many people continue to read it.
  • Im very grateful to the author, Roy Walker, who continued to fill out the story.
  • My fathers practice was the first Black-owned law firm on Wall Street; then he went from being a lawyer into a business owner.
  • Im a recovering striver, and this informs the methodology behind All Star Code — the organization that we founded in 2013 to develop men of color with an entrepreneurial mindset.
  • I spent a lifetime focused on achievement.  This has many benefits  excellence, high standards, and pushing yourself.
  • The challenge with a focus solely on achievement is that you can end up not understanding who you are.  You can end up doing something just because it’s the best and not because you really want to do it.
  • You have to be clear about your purpose and your impact, or you can end up having spent years doing something you never wanted to do.
  • In a high-achievement household, my sister and I learned how to make a plan and execute.
  • A crucial life skill is to be able to set a goal, make a plan to achieve it, and understand when that plan isn’t working out, so you can pivot.
  • When it doesn’t work, think again; try again; try it differently.
  • Being successful isn’t worth your health or your life.
  • You have to find harmony in your activities.
  • With an eye and vision for the future, I saw that tech was an ecosystem that people of color were not participating in.
  • The products in the tech industry, when they take off, they change the world; and if the Black and Latina communities aren’t participating in this, they’re really missing out.
  • If you’re able to diversify into the tech industry, there are so many opportunities.
  • At All Star Code, our goal is to be a clear pipeline into the tech ecosystem, and we are committed to ensuring that our students have the tools they need to thrive in technological world.
  • The biggest mistake or fail that I made in the early years was not doing branding from the very beginning with All Star Code.
  • For many people who are high achieving or perfectionists, some of the missed opportunities are in things that they didn’t pursue or said no to because they felt too risky — things that you beat all the joy out of because you were scared.
  • 55% of students at All Star Code are first-generation students.
  • If you have the ability to tell the computer what to do, you’ll have a level independence.
  • Interested in starting a non-profit?  Christina has this advice for you:  Survey from the very beginning, and include evidence-based thinking from the outset.
  • You know you’re doing good work, but how will you measure it? Being able to measure or quantify your success is crucial to sustainability.

THIS EPISODE WAS SPONSORED BY:

The Campaign for Black Male Achievement. Join, support and invest in this movement to help improve the life outcomes of our black men and boys.

 

DID YOU ENJOY THIS PODCAST?

If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, help us reach more trailblazers like you by leaving us a 5 star review! Ratings, reviews and subscribes are extremely helpful to expanding our reach within the Apple community.

 

C. David Moody Jr: The Price, Rewards and Challenges Of Entrepreneurship | 160

C. David Moody Jr: The Price, Rewards and Challenges Of Entrepreneurship | 160

Be honest with yourself about what youre good at doing!

Today, C. David Moody Jr. returns to Trailblazers.FM for his second feature on the podcast. Sir David was one of my very first guests way back on episode 11.

Charles David Moody, Jr. is the President and Chief Executive Officer of C.D. Moody Construction Company, Inc., a Black Enterprise BE 100s listed company for several consecutive years.  Mr. Moody is a graduate of both Morehouse College and Howard University.  Today, he runs one of Atlanta's top private companies, responsible for helping build several iconic landmarks.

My ask today is that you’d share this episode. If you're posting to social, please use the hashtag #missionfuel

KEY POINTS FROM DAVID:

  • As you age, one of the things you really learn to appreciate is your family, your close friends  people who really matter to you; but most importantly you really learn to value time.
  • Aging has taught me the value of time.
  • People who are very, very successful still cant buy more time.  It’s the most valuable asset that all of us have.
  • When I think of Black History Month I think of people like my paternal grandfather, James Moody, who came to America in 1901 at 17 years old from British Honduras, now Belize.  He knew no one and worked his way over on a banana boat, but he came to America because he wanted to get an education.  He was willing to come to Jim Crow segregation and deal with all that because he wanted an education. 
  • I think of my maternal grandmother who was a sharecropper in Georgia and moved to Chicago in the great migration, … and people who didnt get an opportunity to do things because of the color of their skin.
  • When I think of Black History month I think of all those unsung heroes who never gave up and whose names well never know
  • Millennials who are hungry for success: Take information from the advice given and make it work for you, while applying patience, patience and more patience.
  • Success to me means that I was able to be there for my children.
  • Don’t be so busy that you use business as an excuse to not be there for your family.
  • Be patient; put the work in; and understand that it just takes time. 
  • Theres a price you pay to be an entrepreneur:  You never stop working! 
  • I will age but Ill never become old.
  • You will be knocked to your knees in your lifetime and wonder how you will make it through, but you will find out how strong you are through the experience.
  • As a victim of child sexual abuse, you can overcome; you can heal; and you can lead incredible lives.
  • Nobody told us life would be easy, but it sure is fun, if you dont give up.

THIS EPISODE WAS SPONSORED BY:

The Campaign for Black Male Achievement. Join, support and invest in this movement to help improve the life outcomes of our black men and boys.

 

DID YOU ENJOY THIS PODCAST?

If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, help us reach more trailblazers like you by leaving us a 5 star review! Ratings, reviews and subscribes are extremely helpful to expanding our reach within the Apple community.

 

4 Black Business Legends Who Paved The Way For The Rest Of Us | 159

4 Black Business Legends Who Paved The Way For The Rest Of Us | 159

Every Black History Month we celebrate our Black athletes, civil rights leaders and artists. But too often we overlook our legacy as Black entrepreneurs, business owners and executives, despite having just as deep a legacy in those areas.

Today, Alfred Edmond Jr. returns to Trailblazers.FM for his third feature and second of what we hope to be an annual episode of Alfred sharing stories of our Black business legends.

Alfred is the Senior Vice President and Executive Editor-at-Large of Black Enterprise.

Some time ago, Alfred brought it to my attention that there's often very little conversation about black legacy in business. That fueled my invitation to him to join me on episode 107 for our first Black business legends episode. That episode has gone on to become one of our most downloaded episodes ever on this podcast.

Here are a few of the people who’ve had an impact on the Black community and Black business, and in many cases changed American business in many ways:

  • Berry Gordy
  • Tom Burrell
  • Comer Cottrell
  • Cathy Hughes

My ask today is that you’d share this episode with your family, friends and others in the Black community. If you're posting to social, please use the hashtags #blackbusinesslegend and #missionfuel Let’s be reminded of those who paved a path for us. It’s on us to keep these business legends top of mind and ensure they are never forgotten.

KEY POINTS FROM ALFRED:

  • Every Black History month we celebrate athletes, civil rights leaders and artists, and they all should be celebrated. But too often we overlook our legacy as entrepreneurs, business owners and executives. We have just as deep a legacy in those areas.
  • Berry Gordy is an icon, not just of Black history but American business and American industry  from fashion to music to film. He founded Motown in 1959. He was the prototype for the likes of Russell Simmons, P. Diddy and other industry recording artists who also expanded in film, fashion and other areas. He’s a living iconic legend.
  • In the world of advertising, we dont always recognize the force that Black-owned ad agencies were in terms of driving Black media, Black business creation and Black imagery and messaging.  Tom Burrell founded his advertising agency in 1971, and built it into one of the most influential ad agencies in general, and one of the number one Black ad agencies.  He’s in the advertising hall of fame and authored the book, “Brainwashed” — a deep study in how advertising messages have shaped the perception of Black Americans for good and for bad.
  • Comer Cottrell founded Proline Corp in 1970 and made his first million in sales 3 years later.  He was one of the first companies to take the jerry curl out of salons and create a kit that people could use at home by themselves.
  • My success doesnt mean much if I’m not using it to leverage broader success in the community as a whole. #BlackExcellence #BlackBizLegend
  • Cathy Hughes was the founder of RadioOne.  She pioneered The Quiet Storm” format on Howard University’s radio station that we now accept as a mainstream element of urban radio.  She built her business from the ground up.  In her own words, “I just kept going until I heard yes!”
  • Black History Month is not just for Black people! These icons are Black history figures because of their impact as representatives of the Black community but also far beyond to other cultures.
  • These trailblazers not only changed how business is done by Black people but how business is done by America.
  • The idea of targeted marketing by segments was pioneered by John Johnson and subsequently Earl Graves, Ed Lewis, Tom Burrell and the Black ad agencies that said, “Black people are not just brown-skinned white people.” 
  • Im not starting from scratch. I’m building something from a blueprint, a pattern, that I can adapt to innovate to make my contribution.

THIS EPISODE WAS SPONSORED BY:

The Campaign for Black Male Achievement. Join, support and invest in this movement to help improve the life outcomes of our black men and boys.

 

DID YOU ENJOY THIS PODCAST?

If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, help us reach more trailblazers like you by leaving us a 5 star review! Ratings, reviews and subscribes are extremely helpful to expanding our reach within the Apple community.