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A Black Physicist Founder Aims To Cure Cancer with Dr. Hadiyah-Nicole Green | 210

A Black Physicist Founder Aims To Cure Cancer with Dr. Hadiyah-Nicole Green | 210

Hear this Black woman physicist's revolutionary approach to cure cancer. Inspired by the loss of her aunt, Dr. Hadiyah-Nicole Green has developed what may become a new cure for cancer. Our conversation happened at this unique time during her trailblazing path to treat cancer in this revolutionary new way. Hear her story and how she needs our support to help her realize this massive goal.

OUR GUEST THIS WEEK: DR. HADIYAH-NICOLE GREEN

Dr. Hadiyah-Nicole Green is one of the first African American women in the United States to earn a Ph.D. in physics, holds the distinction of being only the second African American woman and is the fourth African American to receive a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).

With more than ten years of interdisciplinary research experience, Dr. Green specializes in developing targeted cancer therapies using lasers and nanoparticles. Her expertise lies at the intersection of nanotechnology, immunotherapy, and precision medicine. She is noted for the development of several patent-pending cancer treatments that have had no observable side effects in laboratory mice, which is a preliminary study to testing with human subjects. The U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) recently awarded Dr. Green a $1.1 million grant for the ongoing research of her 4-in-1 system for early detection, imaging, targeting, and selective treatment of head and neck cancers. More importantly, it supports the further development of a platform cancer therapy that uses laser-activated nanoparticles to completely eliminate tumors after a single treatment.

Dr. Green’s ultimate goal is to translate these treatments from the laboratory into humans to demonstrate efficacy in a variety of cancer models, including those in head and neck, breast, colorectal, brain, lung, ovarian, cervical, pancreatic, anal, skin, and prostate cancers. In all, this more than $200 million endeavor could lead to saving some of the 8.8 million people who die each year from cancer worldwide.

Beyond her academic role, she founded a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, the Ora Lee Smith Cancer Research Foundation (www.WeAreOraLee.org) – named in memory of her late aunt who raised her. Dr. Green has intertwined her life’s purpose into the mission of the organization: to change the way cancer is treated and reduce the suffering of cancer patients by providing a treatment that is accessible, affordable, and most importantly, effective.

For her groundbreaking work, Dr. Green was recently presented the. Key to the City by the City of Selma, Alabama; the Research Advocate of the Year Award by the Southern Company and Perennial Strategy Group; the Distinguished Trailblazer Award by The National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc., Metropolitan Atlanta Chapter; and the Trailblazer of the Year Award by the 100 Black Men of America, Inc. Additionally, Dr. Green was awarded the 2016 Root 100 by The Root magazine and the 2016 Power 100 by Ebony magazine as one of the “100 Most Influential African Americans” in the United States.

JOIN OUR BLAZER NATION COMMUNITY

You’re invited to join our Blazer Nation community and watch full length videos of some of our of conversations there, along with connecting with our tribe of other likeminded Black entrepreneurs and leaders: https://www.facebook.com/groups/blazernation.

We are seeking a few select partners for Trailblazers.FM for our 2021 campaign. If you’d like to reach out to Stephen regarding sponsorship opportunities, please email stephen@stephenahart.com.

CONNECT WITH DR. HADIYAH-NICOLE GREEN

Website:               oralee.org
Twitter:                 @drhadiyahgreen
LinkedIn:              /in/hadiyah-nicole-green-phd

RESOURCES MENTIONED:

DR. GREEN RECOMMENDS TAKING THIS ACTION

Say NO to something, so that you can say YES to some time for self care, extra time for family, exercise, reading a book. Say NO to something that is not essential. So say NO to one thing this week and YES to a quality thing that moves your mission forward.

 

THIS EPISODE WAS SPONSORED BY:

Today’s episode of the Trailblazers.FM podcast is brought to you by Brand You Academy.

Brand You Academy

In a COVID influenced world, we are working online, shopping online and going to school online.  And yet, many of you are still invisible online when someone Googles you, meaning you’ve got little to no digital presence. No matter how great you are, you aren’t standing out if no one can find you online. It's never been more important that while you focus on building your business or developing your career, that you also prioritize building your personal brand.

If you aren’t sure where to start that process or what exactly you need to do –  consider investing in Brand You Academy. It’s an online self-paced course that gives you the know how, resources and a host of tools you'll need to begin to build an amazing personal brand that gets you noticed, booked and paid. To learn more visit brandyouacademy.co and use the coupon code BLAZERNATION at checkout to get a $200 discount.

DID YOU ENJOY THIS PODCAST?

If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, help us reach more trailblazers like you by leaving us a 5 star review! Ratings, reviews and subscribes are extremely helpful to expanding our reach within the Apple community.

 

Choose to Thrive in the Face of Adversity | 209

Choose to Thrive in the Face of Adversity | 209

You are a product of your choices, NOT a victim of your circumstances. Your biggest challenges can be transformed into the foundation for extraordinary personal growth.

Today’s conversation is JT McCormick.

JT McCormick serves as the President and CEO of Scribe Media, a publishing company that helps you write, publish and market your book. The company has worked with more than 1,500 authors and Entrepreneur Magazine recently ranked Scribe as having the #1 Top Company Culture in America.

Previously, JT served as the President of Headspring Software, which he helped grow to a multi-million dollar, 100-plus person company that was repeatedly ranked as one of the best places to work in all of Texas.

JT is also the author of I Got There: How a Mixed-Race Kid Overcame Racism, Poverty, and Abuse to Achieve the American Dream. His book tells the story of how he worked his way out of poverty, starting with his career cleaning toilets and eventually becoming the President of multiple companies.

In addition to his role at Scribe Media, JT has mentored at-risk youth in the juvenile justice system, as well as youth in low economic communities. JT’s work has been featured on CNBC, Entrepreneur, Forbes, Inc, and many others. He lives in Austin, Texas, with his wife, Megan, and their four children Ava, Jaxon, Elle and Jace.

JOIN OUR BLAZER NATION COMMUNITY

You’re invited to join our Blazer Nation community and watch full length videos of some of our of conversations there, along with connecting with our tribe of other likeminded Black entrepreneurs and leaders: https://www.facebook.com/groups/blazernation.

We are seeking a few select partners for Trailblazers.FM for our 2021 campaign. If you’d like to reach out to Stephen regarding sponsorship opportunities, please email stephen@stephenahart.com.

CONNECT WITH JT MCCORMICK

Website:               scribemedia.com
Twitter:                 @realjtmccormick
LinkedIn:              /in/jtmccormick/

RESOURCES MENTIONED:

TWEETABLES:

 

JT RECOMMENDS TAKING THIS ACTION

Be

 

THIS EPISODE WAS SPONSORED BY:

Today’s episode of the Trailblazers.FM podcast is brought to you by Brand You Academy.

Brand You Academy

In a COVID influenced world, we are working online, shopping online and going to school online.  And yet, many of you are still invisible online when someone Googles you, meaning you’ve got little to no digital presence. No matter how great you are, you aren’t standing out if no one can find you online. It's never been more important that while you focus on building your business or developing your career, that you also prioritize building your personal brand.

If you aren’t sure where to start that process or what exactly you need to do –  consider investing in Brand You Academy. It’s an online self-paced course that gives you the know how, resources and a host of tools you'll need to begin to build an amazing personal brand that gets you noticed, booked and paid. To learn more visit brandyouacademy.co and use the coupon code BLAZERNATION at checkout to get a $200 discount.

DID YOU ENJOY THIS PODCAST?

If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, help us reach more trailblazers like you by leaving us a 5 star review! Ratings, reviews and subscribes are extremely helpful to expanding our reach within the Apple community.

 

Tawan Davis Discusses The Long-Term, Intergenerational Asset Class – Real Estate | 196

Tawan Davis Discusses The Long-Term, Intergenerational Asset Class – Real Estate | 196

I want to create long-term wealth that will last multiple generations and that produces cash; among the different options to invest, real estate is a very, very clear option.

Our featured trailblazer is Tawan Davis.

Tawan Davis is the Chief Executive Officer and Managing Partner of The Steinbridge Group, which has structured, executed and invested nearly $1 billion in commercial and residential real estate. Under Mr. Davis’ leadership—which includes managing the investment program and overseeing the day-to-day operations and transaction pipeline—Steinbridge is now investing more than $425 million in the urban single-family home market.

My ask today is that you’d help share this episode. If you're posting to social, please tag @tbpod and use the hashtag #TrailblazersFM

KEY POINTS FROM TAWAN:

  • I am, and so many of us are, really a product of our collective context. 
  • In my family’s tree, I am the first person that I know with a four-year college degree. There are people who have started and stopped, but I was the first person to go and stick it out.
  • The conservative, religious context in which my mother raised me has a lot to do with that [my accomplishments]. On the one hand my mom was just a stickler for good behavior and ethical behavior, and so I didn’t get involved with a lot of things that other people got involved in.  
  • I grew up with several cousins who are like brothers to me to this day.  There were five of us, and my great-grandmother would have to take care of all of us while our parents worked.
  • I’m the only guy that finished high school in 4 years and not even to mention having gone on to have the opportunity to get a higher education.  So, it was my mother’s unique focus on personal and ethical discipline.  That, plus the fact that I became very involved in my community and in the church very early, gave me a reason to want to go to school, gave me a reason to want to improve myself, it gave me a reason to want to do more and affirm myself.
  • Because I was involved in my church, I was involved in the youth programs, that led me to be involved in the NAACP at a state and national level.  I was a member of the youth and college committee, the national NAACP.  I served as an interim chairman for half a term.  So all of those things exposed me to a whole new world that growing up in Portland, Oregon would not have exposed me to
  • Growing up there, there was not a lot of exposure to very well educated, very accomplished African-American people, and so there were one or two glimpses of that — one was in the church being surrounded by people who had at least some accomplishment, some aspirations, ministers that were forward looking and the NAACP where I met a guy name Lucius Hicks who was chairman of the Oregon State NAACP, and who was the chairman of the Portland School Board, and who was a pusher of education that let me travel with him to the state, regional and national events of the NAACP where I met Merley Evers at the time who was chairman of the board of the NAACP and all of these remarkably accomplished historic leaders in the African American community and that transformed my vision of what was possible as a young man. 
  • My approach to real estate, broadly, is that real estate is a long-term, intergenerational asset class.
  • Let’s start with where you put your money.  Most of us only have so much money, so you’ve got to make a few, kind of broad decisions:  Do you put it in the bank or do you invest it? Do you spend it? That’s decision #1.
  • Decision #2:  If you’re going to invest it, what do you invest in? Do you buy stocks, bonds, options, private equity or real estate?
  • For me, the answer was that I want to create long-term wealth that will last multiple generations and that produces cash; then, among the different options to invest, real estate is a very, very clear option. Then you have to decide, do you invest in the US or Latin America, United Kingdom or Europe or elsewhere?
  • The United States remains the most lucrative, stable, risk-adjusted investment market in the world.  More money comes here than anywhere else in the world, and the United States still produces better returns over longer period of time, because they're stable returns.  You might make more money investing in Latin America one year, but you could also lose more money in the next year.
  • Over long periods of time, the United States, for the developed economy is the strongest investment profile.
  • My mantra is to build long-term, intergenerational, cash flowing assets. So, the goal, over time is to acquire real estate and then augment or increase the cash flow over time. 
  • In the United States there is a perennial demand, a long-term perpetual demand for good housing and for residences, and so it became clear to me that the opportunity in real estate, for my generation, over the next 10-, 20-, 30- years was really in the housing sector, providing good quality housing for American people. 
  • Most good businesses, in fact, all good businesses identify and strategically solve a particular problem.  Solving a problem is the opportunity.
  • There is a huge housing crisis, and how most investors and real estate developers respond to that housing crisis early on was by building really high-end, really fancy buildings.
  • If you are the average person in the United States, if you are a teacher, or a nurse, or a police officer,  or a firefighter, you cannot afford what the real estate development community delivered as a response to the housing crisis. … It’s the wrong solution for the average American family.
  • There is a humungous housing crisis in every major city in the United States for working people, and we all know that because we all feel rents rising; we all feel and observe the displacement of communities like the one I grew up in, where people have been there for generations but can no longer afford the taxes that are associated with those neighborhoods.
  • The solution is not to build yet another glass tower and charge people 4 or $5,000  for rent. The solution here is to invest in the very same neighborhood where  these people, want to live, these nice neighborhoods, these transitioning neighborhoods, these improving neighborhoods, and provide a product that is affordable.
  • I understand how jarring it is, as an African American person, to experience gentrification, but the most gentrification is actually not even ethnic and racial, it is economic.
  • The most challenging part of our business is the people, and I will admit to you that that is an iterative process.  Any entrepreneur, it they are honest, will tell you they never get the people right the first time.  It is either their problem because they don’t know themselves well enough to attract and retain complements to themselves or they have attracted the wrong people.  But I don’t know a single entrepreneur that has done it right the first time. And that's been our experience.  It has been iterative.  I have gone out built teams and then over time, little by little, you better understand what you need and you have to make adjustments. You add people; you take people away.  And so being okay at the centre of this kind of perpetual dynamic and constant change, as a company grows and matures, is a very important part of being an entrepreneur; being at the centre of the changing landscape of people as the company strengthens and matures is very important. So that’s mindset #1.
  • Mindset #2, I think for me, was to identify and strengthen your core.  So once I was able to really clarify what the company needed and attract those people, I have been able to really strengthen and solidify.  I know who the core of our company is.
  • Lesson #3 … it’s so important to be values.  People have to connect with your values.  I always tell people that come to work with us and for us, “I don’t want you to do what I want you to do .  I want you to do what you want you to do.  I want you to achieve your goals.  I don’t want you to achieve Steinbridge’s goals.  But if it so happens that Steinbridge’s goals overlaps with your goals, then we should work together for awhile, and you should join our team.  And, if on the other hand, Steinbridge’s aspirations, goals, values and ethics don’t overlap with your aspirations, goals, values and ethics, then let’s agree to be friends, but we shouldn’t work together.”  
  • I don’t run a manufacturing plant per se, where I just have to attract people just to play a role.  I actually have to attract people to make a contribution. 
  • I am a man in process.  I am a man on a walk.
  • For an entrepreneurial CEO, which is a very specific skillset — the most important skillset for an entrepreneurial CEO is to consider himself an evangelist. I preach the gospel of Steinbridge. I preach the gospel of development, the gospel of empowerment, the gospel of economic opportunity.  I have to be a constant champion for the cause, and that requires a certain amount of passion, it requires a certain amount of clarity.  It requires irrational conviction. 
  • My path has been to beat down the doors of poverty and economic opportunity by building a company, by building a big business, by building a company that employs people. 
  • So, I am passionate. I am an evangelist for my particular calling and that is the calling of economic development and economic opportunity with Steinbridge as a vehicle for that impact.

 

ONE ACTION

  • Write it down! If you don’t write it down, it doesn’t exist.
  • We have limited time on the earth, and we have limited time to engage in a particular pursuit; and so anything we must do, we must put it on a schedule. It has to be a realistic schedule; it has to be an accomplishable schedule.  But it still needs to be on a schedule because if it’s not on a schedule, it won’t get done.

 

THIS EPISODE WAS SPONSORED BY:

The Campaign for Black Male Achievement. Join, support and invest in this movement to help improve the life outcomes of our black men and boys.

DID YOU ENJOY THIS PODCAST?

If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, help us reach more trailblazers like you by leaving us a 5 star review! Ratings, reviews and subscribes are extremely helpful to expanding our reach within the Apple community.

 

Anthony Smith: Keeping Young Black Men and Boys Safe, Healthy and Hopeful | 190

Anthony Smith: Keeping Young Black Men and Boys Safe, Healthy and Hopeful | 190

Cities United works to support the network of Mayors who are concerned with the issue of keeping young Black men and boys and their families safe, healthy and hopeful. Cities United partners with these leaders in the quest to reduce the homicide of Black men and boys by 50% by the year 2025.

Our featured guest today is Anthony Smith, CEO of Cities United.

My ask today is that you’d help share this episode. If you're posting to social, please tag @tbpod and use the hashtag #TrailblazersFM

KEY POINTS FROM ANTHONY:

  • I’m grateful for the time and space created at the convening to reconnect with our ancestors and recognize the 400th year since the first enslaved African came to the shores of America.
  • Cities United works to support the network of Mayors who are concerned with the issue of keeping young Black men and boys and their families safe, healthy and hopeful.
  • Cities United partners with these leaders in the quest to reduce the homicide of Black men and boys by 50% by the year 2025.
  • @CitiesUnited: Our goal is not only to keep Black men and boys alive but to help them thrive, with better educational and employment outcomes.
  • @CitiesUnited:  We work with cities to create a two-pronged approach to balance and prevention: (1) how do you keep young people, those who are in harm’s way, alive today; and (2) how do you create agendas and policies that break the cycle, so that we don’t have young men and women and girls in harm’s way.
  • We help cities design a comprehensive public safety plan, reimagining what public safety is, how it is defined, and how it’s funded.
  • Public safety is access to quality education, access to great housing, and access to jobs.
  • If young people are in harm’s way or in trouble, their parents are most likely in trouble, too.
  • We look at a two-generational approach — not just the youth in front of you, but who they go home to, and who supports them along the way.
  • Homicide is a national epidemic, but it happens in cities.  If we can help the cities with good strategies, we can help reduce that number.
  • Do your work in a way that it can be owned by the community, and no matter who is in office, the community is going to demand that this work continues.
  • Black male achievement highlights the fact that Black men and boys have always been able to achieve even with the disadvantage of racism and certain policies.
  • On Black male achievement, we consider how to celebrate those who are achieving, and how to create space for those who are struggling, and how to make sure that this is not about some of us but all of us.
  • We have to help young people find their purpose and then live in that purpose; we have to create space for them to do that.
  • If young Black men and boys are growing up in communities where they see themselves, where they know they can connect and thrive, we won’t have as many homicides and shootings, because they see other options and other ways out.
  • What we’re dealing with today is the remnants of all the bad policies — from redlining to urban renewal — all of the things that have kept our communities cut out of opportunities.
  • It doesn’t matter who is in office, because nobody is paying attention to the root causes of why we’re dealing with these issues.
  • Everybody wants to be tough on crime, but nobody wants to deal with the issue of why crime is produced.
  • Mayors are central to the strategy for creating the change we want to see; they have convening power with the ability to bring people to the table.
  • We’re about coaching and preparing the current generation of leaders and making sure that we create space for others.

 

 

ONE ACTION

  • Find your purpose — what you’re supposed to be doing — and stay true to that. 

THIS EPISODE WAS SPONSORED BY:

The Campaign for Black Male Achievement. Join, support and invest in this movement to help improve the life outcomes of our black men and boys.

DID YOU ENJOY THIS PODCAST?

If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, help us reach more trailblazers like you by leaving us a 5 star review! Ratings, reviews and subscribes are extremely helpful to expanding our reach within the Apple community.

 

A Nicole Campbell: The Power of Being Relational | 189

A Nicole Campbell: The Power of Being Relational | 189

Being relational drives business. Your brand/business must be about more than just transactions in order for it to thrive. The beauty happens in between the transactions/deals. When you are relational, you step into the spaces between transactions, so to speak, and that step-in is what makes clients come back, makes them choose you, makes colleagues recommend you, and makes people want to work with you.

Our featured guest today is A. Nicole Campbell.

Nicole (Nic) is a mom first, and everything else falls into place because of it. She's an MIT graduate and an attorney who has served in senior leadership positions for two billionaire hedge fund giants. 

Nic recently transitioned to a new role, having founded Build Up Advisory Group (February, 2019). Her firm specializes in designing and building systems to help nonprofits, philanthropies, social entrepreneurs, and philanthropists thrive. She's working to scale it to create the kind of workplace she's always wanted to work in.

Build Up, Inc. is a boutique capacity builder that holistically supports leaders of color and projects and nonprofits led by people of color that serve under-resourced communities. Probably the first of its kind, and hopefully it can serve as a model for other fiscal sponsors.

My ask today is that you’d help share this episode. If you're posting to social, please tag @tbpod and use the hashtag #TrailblazersFM

KEY POINTS FROM NIC:

  • I really am so thankful and grateful to have my two little girls.  They have really aligned my priorities and my life.  I used to ask myself the question of ‘what could I be?’ and they’ve made me change that to ‘how good can I become?'
  • My mom instilled in us that education is important, and this is how you can achieve anything.  It’s the one thing that no one can take away from you. 
  • With an education and a strong foundation, you can pretty much do anything.
  • My education at MIT set me up to be a problem solver that comes to problems with different levels of expertise and experience to bear on how I then solve that problem.
  • I’m no longer a lawyer that comes to the problem and gives you my legal opinion; but I am a problem solver that happens to have legal experience and expertise.
  • Build Up Advisory Group specializes in infrastructure design.  We focus on building out the organizational infrastructure of philanthropists and non-profits.  We spend a lot of time with leaders of these organizations, helping them set up the foundation, so that they can deliver on their mission and make sure that their programmatic work is supported.
  • We serve these organizations through the lens of governance, grant making, and organizational design.
  • If an organization is doing good programmatic work, and you strengthen their infrastructure, they will do outstanding work.
  • Black Male Achievement means the celebration of Black boys and men, recognizing how amazing they are, and putting that at the forefront of the conversation we are having about society and how we can improve.
  • If there is Black Male Achievement, then everyone is achieving.
  • Being relational drives business.  In service-based professions, we tend to move on a transaction-by-transaction basis, but there are spaces in between those transactions.
  • In between those transactions, in those spaces, are where your client and the organization are most vulnerable; that’s where they have the need.
  • If you’re not asking questions about what’s happening in between transactions and providing a level of support in between those transactions, you’re missing out on a huge part of the relationship with your client and a huge part of the service that you can provide to your client.
  • People keep coming back to you because of how you relate to them and how they relate to you.
  • They will keep picking you, want to work with you, and refer you to other people, because they feel supported, and they feel that you are a resource.  You can only get there, if you are relational.
  • While you might be able to provide transaction-level support, you’re not able to provide the holistic support that your client will benefit from, without expertise.
  • If you’re a grant-making organization, put organizations that are focused on under-resourced communities — particularly those that are led by people of colour —  on your radar; and allow them to tell their own stories rather than you or the organization stepping in to tell their story for them, thinking that you’re doing it better.
  • Build Up, Inc. helps to create or build the capacity of leaders of colour and projects and organizations that are supporting under-resourced communities.

 

ONE ACTION (+ A LIL EXTRA)

  • Lean in to you! In the morning, affirm “I believe in me.  I believe in my capabilities.  I believe in my abilities. I believe in who I am.”
  • Once you leave your home, your cocoon, your safety net, and you go out into the world, there is going to be so many things that are trying to tear you down from that and pull you down from that.  So, if you start your day with this affirmation, it goes a very long way when you fail in something and need to recover.
  • When you come back home, reflect and assess, “How did I lean into me day?  Where did I show up? When did you shy away?  When did you step away? and Why?”

THIS EPISODE WAS SPONSORED BY:

The Campaign for Black Male Achievement. Join, support and invest in this movement to help improve the life outcomes of our black men and boys.

DID YOU ENJOY THIS PODCAST?

If you're listening on Apple Podcasts, help us reach more trailblazers like you by leaving us a 5 star review! Ratings, reviews and subscribes are extremely helpful to expanding our reach within the Apple community.