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RM Harrison is business strategist and pivot consultant, helping women entrepreneurs build a path to personal fulfillment in their careers, so they can avoid burnout and sustain the motivation they need to achieve their fullest potential.

As the author of “The Pivot Map: Uncovering Your Path to Sustainable Success…”, RM literally wrote the book on how to pivot when you’ve hit an emotional and motivation plateau in business.

And when she isn’t glued to her laptop, you can find her out scouting for the best eggs benedict dish in her new hometown, Austin, TX.

[Tweet “#PODCAST RM Harrison: The New Rules of Entrepreneurial Success @HelloRMHarrison”]

Listen On Apple Podcasts

Connect with RM:

Tweetables:

[Tweet “It’s dangerous to silo yourself as an entrepreneur. Surround yourself with people who see you”]
[Tweet “Pivoting is a natural, normal part of the journey. Success isn’t linear @HelloRMHarrison”]
[Tweet “If what’s happening now isn’t getting me there, then it’s not working, and I need to pivot”]

Key take aways from RM:

  • The entrepreneurial journey began for me at about 19 years old when I took a break from undergrad and entered the corporate world.  Very quickly I felt like this is not for me.
  • I interned for one of the country’s only Black PR firm based in Silvers Spring, Maryland, and they hired me full-time as their receptionist.
  • I was grateful to have a job.  I liked the image of working, being a professional, having a job and a salary.
  • I wasn’t supposed to do well, according to society’s standards.  I wasn’t supposed to be white collar.
  • I didn’t like having to show up everyday and do the same thing every single day.  I didn’t know what was next for me but I knew it wasn’t this.  That’s when I began to consider what self-employment would look like.
  • I thought that being self-employed or a freelancer I would have more control over my time and what I do.
  • It wasn’t so much the examples of other people doing it but I knew the 9 to 5 box of an existence just wasn’t for me, and so the alternative must be self-employment.
  • I started offering graphic design services, doing freelance design on the side.
  • On March 1, 2011 RM-Harrison Strategy and Design was born.
  • When you’re trying to figure out who you are in the world and what you have to offer, it’s not only about that people are going to see you, take note of, and most importantly want to pay you for, but what’s going to be meaningful and exciting today and 10 years from now.
  • It was hard for me to piece together what’s workable, what’s marketable for me now, and what can I see myself doing in the future; and there was no support for me in trying to figure that out.
  • I thought I can’t be the only person in the world that’s struggling with this model of success that the world is reflecting back to see, and so I had to figure it out.
  • I had to figure out who I wanted to be in the world and what I had inside of me inherently to offer the world that was meaningful and valuable but also marketable — something I wanted to do and could commit to doing.
  • What did success mean to me?  What were the tenets of that and how could I cultivate that with my career and not feel like I was sacrificing who I was.
  • My entrepreneurship journey was a process of discovery — of myself, what I had to offer and what people valued about me, just as I was, without me doing anything.  Just being.
  • Success would only be meaningful and sustainable if it was also fulfilling.
  • Fulfillment had to do something with me and what I value and not what anyone else thinks or values.
  • Success would only be sustainable if I didn’t have to work crazy hard all the time, stretching myself, just to get the money I needed.
  • I realized that there were probably a lot of other people struggling with the same thing, considering entrepreneurship, who maybe have dabbled in a few different things but haven’t found any momentum.
  • You either have an audience or you create one, and women were around.  They were the ones who heard my story, resonated with it and kept showing up in my orbit.
  • I finally came to the place where I understood my own genius and my own worth — the value that I bring to the table.
  • I identified the thing I had that people wanted, needed and were willing to pay me for.
  • What people get the most out of working with me is not tangible at all, so It’s kind of tough to monetize.
  • One of the biggest lessons I learned is that it is dangerous to silo yourself as an entrepreneur.  You have to surround yourself with people who see you.
  • Another valuable lesson I learned is that you can’t let entrepreneurship be the only thing working in your life because when it doesn’t work and you have nothing to fall back on, it’s a hot mess.
  • Entrepreneurs see opportunities to create social and economic impact, to create value and make money.  But there has to be other things. It is certainly not the only way that you are useful and valuable in the world.  You need other things to fill your cup.
  • If you’re experiencing an entrepreneurial roadblock, honour the fact that you’re there.  Recognize and acknowledge that this is happening, and then figure out why.
  • The work I do is all about pivoting, which is not always about jumping tracks or starting over.
  • Pivoting is about recognizing what isn’t working, what is not aligning you to where you ultimately want to be and changing your approach to ensure that you get there.
  • Pivoting is a natural, normal part of the journey.  Success isn’t linear.
  • It isn’t about where it’s at today, it’s about where I’m headed.  And if what’s happening now isn’t getting me there, then it’s not working, and I need to pivot.

One Action To Blaze Your Trail:

Decide who you want to be in the world and make sure that the work you do aligns with that. Be honest with yourself, and if it does not, pivot.

 

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